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Diamond








(Labrusca, Vinifera)

Few other grapes surpass Diamond in quality and beauty of fruit. When
to its desirable fruit characters are added hardiness, productiveness
and vigor of vine, the variety is surpassed by no other green grape.
Diamond is a diluted hybrid between Labrusca and Vinifera and the
touch of the exotic grape is just sufficient to give the fruit the
richness in flavor of the Old World grape and not overcome the
refreshing sprightliness of the native fox-grapes. The Vinifera
characters are wholly recessive in vine and foliage, the plant
resembling closely its American parent, Concord. Diamond is well
established North and South and can be grown in as great a range of
latitude as Concord. Jacob Moore, Brighton, New York, grew Diamond
about 1870 from Concord seed fertilized by Iona.

Vine vigorous, hardy, productive. Canes short, brown with a slight
red tinge; nodes enlarged; internodes short; tendrils
intermittent, bifid. Leaves thick; upper surface light green,
dull, smooth; lower surface light bronze, downy; lobes three in
number, indistinct; petiolar sinus very shallow; teeth shallow.
Flowers self-fertile, open early; stamens upright.

Fruit early, keeps well. Clusters medium to short, broad, blunt,
cylindrical, often single-shouldered, compact; pedicel short,
thick with a few inconspicuous warts; brush slender, pale green.
Berries large, ovate, green with a tinge of yellow, glossy,
covered with thin bloom, persistent, firm; skin thin, tough,
adherent, astringent; flesh pale green, transparent, juicy,
tender, melting, fine-grained, aromatic, sprightly; very good.
Seeds free, one to four, broad and long, sharp-pointed,
yellowish-brown.





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