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Herbemont








(Bourquiniana)

Bottsi, Brown French, Dunn, Herbemont's Madeira, Hunt, Kay's
Seedling, McKee, Neal, Warren, Warrenton

In the South, Herbemont holds the same rank as Concord in the North.
The vine is fastidious as to soil, requiring a well-drained warm soil,
and one which is abundantly supplied with humus. Despite these
limitations, this variety is grown in an immense territory, extending
from Virginia and Tennessee to the Gulf and westward through Texas.
The vine is remarkably vigorous, being hardly surpassed in this
character by any other of our native grapes. The fruits are
attractive because of the large bunch and the glossy black of the
small berries, and are borne abundantly and with certainty in suitable
localities. The flesh characters of the fruit are good for a small
grape, neither flesh, skin nor seeds being objectionable in eating;
the pulp is tender, juicy, rich, sweet and highly flavored. The ample,
lustrous green foliage makes this variety one of the attractive
ornamental plants of the South. Herbemont is known to have been in
cultivation in Georgia before the Revolutionary War, when it was
generally called Warren and Warrenton. In the early part of the last
century, it came to the hands of Nicholas Herbemont, Columbia, South
Carolina, whose name it eventually took.

Vine very vigorous. Canes long, strong, bright green, with more or
less purple and heavy bloom; internodes short; tendrils
intermittent, bifid or trifid. Leaves large, round, entire, or
three to seven-lobed, nearly glabrous above and below; upper
surface clear green; lower surface lighter green, glaucous.
Flowers self-fertile.

Fruit very late. Clusters large, long, tapering, prominently
shouldered, compact; pedicels short with a few large warts; brush
pink. Berries round, small, uniform, reddish-black or brown with
abundant bloom; skin thin, tough; flesh tender, juicy; juice
colorless or slightly pink, sweet, sprightly. Seeds two to four,
small, reddish-brown, glossy.





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