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Hosford








(Labrusca)

Hosford is an offspring of Concord, differing from the parent chiefly
in the greater size of bunch and berry and in being less fruitful. The
variety is surpassed by Worden and Eaton, of the same type, and is
probably not worth cultivation. It is claimed by some that Hosford is
identical with Eaton but there are noticeable differences in both vine
and fruit characters. The vine looks very like that of Concord except
that the indentations along the margins of the leaves are deeper.
Hosford originated in the garden of George Hosford, Ionia, Michigan,
about 1876, as a chance seedling growing between two Concord vines.

Vines lacking in vigor, hardy, unproductive. Canes short, few in
number, slender; nodes enlarged; internodes very short; tendrils
continuous, bifid or trifid. Leaves medium in size; upper surface
light green, rugose; lower surface grayish-white to bronze,
heavily pubescent; lobes faint; petiolar sinus wide; teeth small,
sharp. Flowers shallow, semi-fertile, open in mid-season; stamens
upright.

Fruit mid-season, does not keep well. Clusters large, tapering,
slightly shouldered, compact; pedicel short with small warts;
brush slender, green. Berries large, round-oval, dull black with
abundant bloom, persistent; skin thick, tender; flesh pale green,
juicy, fine-grained, tender, vinous, sweet; good. Seeds few,
large, broad, blunt, plump, brown.





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