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Rebecca








(Labrusca, Vinifera)

In the middle of the last century, when grape-growing was in the hands
of the connoisseurs, Rebecca was one of the sterling green varieties.
It is wholly unsuited for commercial vineyards and for years has been
disappearing gradually from cultivation. The fruit is exceptionally
fine, consisting of well-formed bunches and berries, the latter
handsome yellowish-white and semi-transparent. In quality, the grapes
are of the best, with a rich, sweet flavor and pleasing aroma. But the
vine characters condemn Rebecca for any but the amateur. The vines
lack in hardiness and vigor, are susceptible to mildew and other fungi
and are productive only under the best conditions. The original vine
was an accidental seedling found in the garden of E. M. Peake, Hudson,
New York, and bore its first fruit in 1852.

Vine weak, sometimes vigorous, doubtfully hardy. Canes long,
numerous, slender, dull brown, deepening in color at the nodes;
tendrils continuous or intermittent, bifid or trifid. Leaves
variable in size; upper surface dark green, dull, rugose; lower
surface grayish-green, pubescent. Flowers self-fertile; stamens
upright.

Fruit late mid-season, ships and keeps well. Clusters small,
short, cylindrical, rarely with a small, single shoulder, compact.
Berries of medium size, oval, green with yellow tinge verging on
amber, thin gray bloom, persistent, firm; skin thin, without
pigment; flesh pale green, very juicy, tender, melting, vinous, a
little foxy, sweet; good to very good. Seeds free, short, narrow,
blunt, brown.





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Previous: Purple Cornichon



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