Informational Site NetworkInformational Site Network
Privacy
 
   Home - Wine Making - On Beer Making - Whiskey Making - Grape Growing


Most Viewed

- A Comparison Of The Processes Of The Brewer With Those Of The Whiskey Distiller
- How To Order Apples In The Hogsheads
- To Sweeten Hogsheads By Burning
- Distilling Of Buckwheat
- Of The Formation Of Vinous Liquors With Grains In Order To Make Spirits
- Of Hogs
- Distilling Of Potatoes
- How To Build A Malt Kiln In Every Distillery
- Malt
- To Make Rye Malt For Stilling
- The Art Of Making Gin After The Process Of The Holland Distillers
- Profits Of A Common Distillery
- Of Spirituous Liquors Or Spirits
- Precautions Against Fire
- How To Clarify Whiskey &c
- How To Distil Apples
- How To Renew Yeast When Sour

Least Viewed

- To Set A Doubling Still
- Use Of The Kettle
- To Make The Best Yeast For Daily Use
- The Best Method Of Setting Stills
- To Mash Rye In The Common Mode
- On Fining Liquors
- To Mash One Third Rye And Two Thirds Corn
- The Following Receipt To Make An Excellent American Wine
- Of The Season For Brewing
- On Colouring Liquors
- To Recover Sour Ale
- Observations On Erecting Distilleries
- To Make Elderberry Wine To Drink Made Warm As A Cordial
- Directions For Making Cider British Mode
- Of The Distiller Of Whiskey
- The Duty Of The Owner Of A Distillery
- To Make Ale Or Any Other Liquor That Is Too New Or Sweet Drink Stale



How To Distil Apples






Apples ought to be perfectly ripe for distillation, as it has been
ascertained from repeated trials, that they produce more and better
spirit, (as well as cider), when fully ripe than if taken green, or the
ripe and unripe mixed--if taken mixed it will not be found practicable
to grind them evenly, or equally fine; those fully ripe will be well
ground, whilst those hard and unripe will be little more than broken or
slightly bruised--and when this coarse and fine mixture is put into a
hogshead to work or ferment, that fully ripe and fine ground, will
immediately begin, and will be nearly if not quite done working before
the other begins, and of course nearly all the spirit contained in the
unripe fruit will be lost--and if it is left standing until the ill
ground unripe fruit is thoroughly fermented, and done working, you will
perceive that a large portion of the spirit contained in the ripe well
ground fruit is evaporated and of course lost.

But if the fruit be all ripe and evenly ground, of course then it will
work regularly and can be distilled in due and right order, and will
produce the greatest quantity of spirit, and much superior to that
produced from uneven, ill-ground or unripe fruit.

Apples cannot be ground too fine.


Next: How To Order Apples In The Hogsheads

Previous: Receipt To Prepare Potatoes For Distilling



Add to del.icio.us Add to Reddit Add to Digg Add to Del.icio.us Add to Google Add to Twitter Add to Stumble Upon
Add to Informational Site Network
Report
Privacy
SHAREADD TO EBOOK


Viewed 2048