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Manuring The Vine








As remarked before, this will seldom be necessary, if the vintner is
careful enough to guard against washing of the top-soil, and to turn
under all leaves, etc., with the plow in the Fall. The best manure is
undoubtedly fresh surface soil from the woods. Should the vines,
however, show a material decrease in vigor, it may become necessary to
use a top-dressing of decomposed leaves, ashes, bone-dust, charcoal,
etc. Fresh stable-yard manure I would consider the last, and only to be
used when nothing better can be obtained. Turn under with the plow, as
soon as the manure is spread. Nothing, I think, is more injurious than
the continual drenching with slops, dish-water, etc., which some good
souls of housewives are fond of bestowing on their pet grape vines in
the garden. It creates a rank, unwholesome growth, and will cause
mildew and rot, if anything can.





Next: Thinning Of The Fruit

Previous: Girdling The Vine To Hasten Maturity



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